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Title: The 2019 eruption of recurrent nova V3890 Sgr: observations by Swift, NICER , and SMARTS
ABSTRACT V3890 Sgr is a recurrent nova that has been seen in outburst three times so far, with the most recent eruption occurring on 2019 August 27 ut. This latest outburst was followed in detail by the Neil Gehrels Swift Observatory, from less than a day after the eruption until the nova entered the Sun observing constraint, with a small number of additional observations after the constraint ended. The X-ray light curve shows initial hard shock emission, followed by an early start of the supersoft source phase around day 8.5, with the soft emission ceasing by day 26. Together with the peak blackbody temperature of the supersoft spectrum being ∼100 eV, these timings suggest the white dwarf mass to be high, $\sim 1.3\, {\rm M_{\odot }}$. The UV photometric light curve decays monotonically, with the decay rate changing a number of times, approximately simultaneously with variations in the X-ray emission. The UV grism spectra show both line and continuum emission, with emission lines of N, C, Mg, and O being notable. These UV spectra are best dereddened using a Small Magellanic Cloud extinction law. Optical spectra from SMARTS show evidence of interaction between the nova ejecta and wind from the donor more » star, as well as the extended atmosphere of the red giant being flash-ionized by the supersoft X-ray photons. Data from NICER reveal a transient 83 s quasi-periodic oscillation, with a modulation amplitude of 5 per cent, adding to the sample of novae that show such short variabilities during their supersoft phase. « less
Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1751874
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10319586
Journal Name:
Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society
Volume:
499
Issue:
4
ISSN:
0035-8711
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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