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Title: Dirac lines and loop at the Fermi level in the time-reversal symmetry breaking superconductor LaNiGa2
Abstract Unconventional superconductors have Cooper pairs with lower symmetries than in conventional superconductors. In most unconventional superconductors, the additional symmetry breaking occurs in relation to typical ingredients such as strongly correlated Fermi liquid phases, magnetic fluctuations, or strong spin-orbit coupling in noncentrosymmetric structures. In this article, we show that the time-reversal symmetry breaking in the superconductor LaNiGa 2 is enabled by its previously unknown topological electronic band structure, with Dirac lines and a Dirac loop at the Fermi level. Two symmetry related Dirac points even remain degenerate under spin-orbit coupling. These unique topological features enable an unconventional superconducting gap in which time-reversal symmetry can be broken in the absence of other typical ingredients. Our findings provide a route to identify a new type of unconventional superconductors based on nonsymmorphic symmetries and will enable future discoveries of topological crystalline superconductors.
Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
2001156
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10324469
Journal Name:
Communications Physics
Volume:
5
Issue:
1
ISSN:
2399-3650
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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