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Title: Influence of collector doping setback in the quantum transport characteristics of GaN/AlN resonant tunneling diodes
Abstract Harnessing resonant tunneling transport in III-nitride semiconductors to boost the operating frequencies of electronic and photonic devices, requires a thorough understanding of the mechanisms that limit coherent tunneling injection. Towards this goal, we present a concerted experimental and theoretical study that elucidates the impact of the collector doping setback on the quantum transport characteristics of GaN/AlN resonant tunneling diodes (RTDs). Employing our analytical model for polar RTDs, we quantify the width of the resonant-tunneling line shape, demonstrating that the setback helps preserve coherent injection. This design results in consistently higher peak-to-valley-current ratios (PVCRs), obtaining a maximum PVCR = 2.01 at cryogenic temperatures.
Authors:
; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1719875
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10325351
Journal Name:
Applied Physics Express
Volume:
14
Issue:
12
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
122003
ISSN:
1882-0778
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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