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This content will become publicly available on June 1, 2023

Title: Mentoring Future Science Leaders to Thrive
Mentoring is a well-known subject, but we know little about it as a science. We need to learn more about how to evolve mentorship. In this article, we propose some new directions for mentorship in the present and the future.
Authors:
; ; ;
Award ID(s):
2011577
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10326376
Journal Name:
Trends in pharmacological sciences
Volume:
43
Issue:
6
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
457-460
ISSN:
0165-6147
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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