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This content will become publicly available on July 1, 2023

Title: Using Participatory Design Studies to Collaboratively Create Teacher Dashboards
Classroom orchestration requires teachers to concurrently manage multiple activities across multiple social levels (individual, group, and class) and under various constraints. Real-time dashboards can support teachers; however, designing actionable dashboards is a huge challenge. This paper describes a participatory design study to identify and inform critical features of a dashboard for displaying relevant, actionable, real-time data. We leveraged a Sense-Assess-Act framework to present dashboard mockups to teachers for feedback. Although the participating teachers differed in how they would use the presented information (during class or after class as a post hoc analysis tool), two common emerging themes were that they wanted to use the data to a) better support their students and b) to make broader instructional decisions. We present data from our study and propose a customizable, mobile dashboard, that can be adapted to a teacher's specific needs at a specific time, to help them better facilitate learning activities.
Authors:
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Award ID(s):
2010483 2019805
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10329344
Journal Name:
International Conference on Artificial Intelligence in Education
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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