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This content will become publicly available on December 1, 2023

Title: Vibrational fingerprints of ferroelectric HfO2
Abstract Hafnia (HfO 2 ) is a promising material for emerging chip applications due to its high- κ dielectric behavior, suitability for negative capacitance heterostructures, scalable ferroelectricity, and silicon compatibility. The lattice dynamics along with phononic properties such as thermal conductivity, contraction, and heat capacity are under-explored, primarily due to the absence of high quality single crystals. Herein, we report the vibrational properties of a series of HfO 2 crystals stabilized with yttrium (chemical formula HfO 2 :  x Y, where x  = 20, 12, 11, 8, and 0%) and compare our findings with a symmetry analysis and lattice dynamics calculations. We untangle the effects of Y by testing our calculations against the measured Raman and infrared spectra of the cubic, antipolar orthorhombic, and monoclinic phases and then proceed to reveal the signature modes of polar orthorhombic hafnia. This work provides a spectroscopic fingerprint for several different phases of HfO 2 and paves the way for an analysis of mode contributions to high- κ dielectric and ferroelectric properties for chip technologies.
Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
2129904
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10329913
Journal Name:
npj Quantum Materials
Volume:
7
Issue:
1
ISSN:
2397-4648
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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