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Title: Binder Jetting Additive Manufacturing: The Effect of Feed Region Density on Resultant Densities
Abstract This technical brief reports an experimental investigation on the effect of feed region density on resultant sintered density and intermediate densities (powder bed density and green density) during the binder jetting additive manufacturing process. The feed region density was increased through compaction. The powder bed density and green density were determined by measuring the mass and dimension. The sintered density was measured with the Archimedes’ method. As the relative feed region density increased from 44% to 65%, the powder bed density increased by 5.7%, green density by 8.5%, and finally sintered density by 4.5%. Statistical testing showed that these effects were significant. This study showed that compacting the powder in the feed region is an effective method to alter the density of parts made via binder jetting additive manufacturing.
Authors:
; ; ;
Award ID(s):
2047908
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10330375
Journal Name:
Journal of Manufacturing Science and Engineering
Volume:
144
Issue:
9
ISSN:
1087-1357
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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