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This content will become publicly available on March 22, 2023

Title: Selective laser melting of metal structures onto graphite substrates via a low melting point interlayer alloy
We demonstrate a process to selective laser melt a metal alloy directly onto graphite. The heat trans- fer applications of metal features printed onto annealed pyrolytic graphite are compelling, as pyrolytic graphite has the second highest in-plane thermal conductivity ( > 1500 W/m-K at room temperature) of any bulk material. While the bonding of metal alloys commonly used in selective laser melting (SLM) with graphite is relatively weak, the proper interlayer material drastically improves the wetting and bond- ing. The challenge is the alloys that typically bond to graphite require extended bonding times at elevated temperatures (minutes to hours), while the SLM process delivers only brief exposures to high tempera- tures ( ∼100 μs). In this paper, we employ a Sn3Ag4Ti alloy that rapidly forms a nanometer-thin layer of TiC, as verified by transmission electron microscopy. The influence of graphite thermal properties on interfacial bond strength is shown by mechanical testing and simulations of selective laser melting.
Authors:
Award ID(s):
1905422
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10331709
Journal Name:
Applied materials today
Volume:
26
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
101334
ISSN:
2352-9415
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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