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This content will become publicly available on December 1, 2023

Title: Dynamic compression of water to conditions in ice giant interiors
Abstract Recent discoveries of water-rich Neptune-like exoplanets require a more detailed understanding of the phase diagram of H 2 O at pressure–temperature conditions relevant to their planetary interiors. The unusual non-dipolar magnetic fields of ice giant planets, produced by convecting liquid ionic water, are influenced by exotic high-pressure states of H 2 O—yet the structure of ice in this state is challenging to determine experimentally. Here we present X-ray diffraction evidence of a body-centered cubic (BCC) structured H 2 O ice at 200 GPa and ~ 5000 K, deemed ice XIX, using the X-ray Free Electron Laser of the Linac Coherent Light Source to probe the structure of the oxygen sub-lattice during dynamic compression. Although several cubic or orthorhombic structures have been predicted to be the stable structure at these conditions, we show this BCC ice phase is stable to multi-Mbar pressures and temperatures near the melt boundary. This suggests variable and increased electrical conductivity to greater depths in ice giant planets that may promote the generation of multipolar magnetic fields.
Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
2020249
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10332398
Journal Name:
Scientific Reports
Volume:
12
Issue:
1
ISSN:
2045-2322
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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