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Title: Practical and fundamental limits of neutral atom entanglement using Rydberg dressing
We revisit the implementation of a two-qubit entangling gate, the Mølmer-Sørensen gate, using the adiabatic Rydberg dressing paradigm. We study the implementation of rapid adiabatic passage using a two-photon transition, which does not require the use of an ultra-violet laser, and can be implemented using only amplitude modulation of one field with all laser frequencies fixed. We find that entangling gate fidelities, comparable to the one-photon excitation, are achievable with the two-photon excitation. Moreover, we address how the adiabatic dressing protocol can be used to implement entangling gates outside the regime of a perfect Rydberg blockade. We show that using adiabatic dressing we can achieve a scaling of gate fidelity set by the fundamental limits to entanglement generated by the Rydberg interactions while simultaneously retaining limited population in the doubly excited Rydberg state. This allows for fast high fidelity gates for atoms separated beyond the blockade radius.
Authors:
; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
2016244
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10340308
Journal Name:
ArXivorg
ISSN:
2331-8422
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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