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This content will become publicly available on July 1, 2023

Title: Experience Matters: Longitudinal Changes in Sensitivity to Rotational Gains in Virtual Reality
Redirected walking techniques use rotational gains to guide users away from physical obstacles as they walk in a virtual world, effectively creating the illusion of a larger virtual space than is physically present. Designers often want to keep users unaware of this manipulation, which is made possible by limitations in human perception that render rotational gains imperceptible below a certain threshold. Many aspects of these thresholds have been studied, however no research has yet considered whether these thresholds may change over time as users gain more experience with them. To study this, we recruited 20 novice VR users (no more than 1 hour of prior experience with an HMD) and provided them with an Oculus Quest to use for four weeks on their own time. They were tasked to complete an activity assessing their sensitivity to rotational gain once each week, in addition to whatever other activities they wanted to perform. No feedback was provided to participants about their performance during each activity, minimizing the possibility of learning effects accounting for any observed changes over time. We observed that participants became significantly more sensitive to rotation gains over time, underscoring the importance of considering prior user experience in applications involving more » rotational gain, as well as how prior user experience may affect other, broader applications of VR. « less
Authors:
; ;
Award ID(s):
1717937
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10359244
Journal Name:
ACM Transactions on Applied Perception
ISSN:
1544-3558
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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