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Title: Infrastructure-Aided Defense for Autonomous Driving Systems: Opportunities and Challenges
Autonomous Driving (AD) is a rapidly developing technology and its security issues have been studied by various recent research works. With the growing interest and investment in leveraging intelligent infrastructure support for practical AD, AD system may have new opportunities to defend against existing AD attacks. In this paper, we are the first to systematically explore such a new AD security design space leveraging emerging infrastructure-side support, which we call Infrastructure-Aided Autonomous Driving Defense (I-A2D2). We first taxonomize existing AD attacks based on infrastructure-side capabilities, and then analyze potential I-A2D2 design opportunities and requirements. We further discuss the potential design challenges for these I-A2D2 design directions to be effective in practice.
Authors:
; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1929771 1932464 2145493
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10359463
Journal Name:
NDSS Workshop on Automotive and Autonomous Vehicle Security (AutoSec)
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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