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Title: Quantum communication with itinerant surface acoustic wave phonons
Abstract

Surface acoustic waves are commonly used in classical electronics applications, and their use in quantum systems is beginning to be explored, as evidenced by recent experiments using acoustic Fabry–Pérot resonators. Here we explore their use for quantum communication, where we demonstrate a single-phonon surface acoustic wave transmission line, which links two physically separated qubit nodes. Each node comprises a microwave phonon transducer, an externally controlled superconducting variable coupler, and a superconducting qubit. Using this system, precisely shaped individual itinerant phonons are used to coherently transfer quantum information between the two physically distinct quantum nodes, enabling the high-fidelity node-to-node transfer of quantum states as well as the generation of a two-node Bell state. We further explore the dispersive interactions between an itinerant phonon emitted from one node and interacting with the superconducting qubit in the remote node. The observed interactions between the phonon and the remote qubit promise future quantum-optics-style experiments with itinerant phonons.

Authors:
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Award ID(s):
2011854 2016136
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10360954
Journal Name:
npj Quantum Information
Volume:
7
Issue:
1
ISSN:
2056-6387
Publisher:
Nature Publishing Group
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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