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Title: Population Mobility and Aging Accelerate the Transmission of Coronavirus Disease 2019 in the Deep South: A County-Level Longitudinal Analysis
Abstract

Population mobility and aging at local areas contributed to the geospatial disparities in the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) transmission among 418 counties in the Deep South. In predicting the incidence of COVID-19, a significant interaction was found between mobility and the proportion of older adults. Effective disease control measures should be tailored to vulnerable communities.

 
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Award ID(s):
2028791
NSF-PAR ID:
10367079
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publisher / Repository:
Oxford University Press
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Clinical Infectious Diseases
Volume:
74
Issue:
Supplement_3
ISSN:
1058-4838
Page Range / eLocation ID:
p. e1-e3
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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