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Title: Multimode nonlinear dynamics in spatiotemporal mode-locked anomalous-dispersion lasers

Spatiotemporal mode-locking in a laser with anomalous dispersion is investigated. Mode-locked states with varying modal content can be observed, but we find it difficult to observe highly-multimode states. We describe the properties of these mode-locked states and compare them to the results of numerical simulations. Prospects for the generation of highly-multimode states and lasers based on multimode soliton formation are discussed.

 
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Award ID(s):
1912742
NSF-PAR ID:
10370186
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ;
Publisher / Repository:
Optical Society of America
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Optics Letters
Volume:
47
Issue:
17
ISSN:
0146-9592; OPLEDP
Page Range / eLocation ID:
Article No. 4439
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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