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Title: Evolution of Urca Pairs in the Crusts of Highly Magnetized Neutron Stars
Abstract

We report on the effects of strong magnetic fields on neutrino emission in the modified Urca process. We show that the effect of Landau levels on the various Urca pairs affects the neutrino emission spectrum and leads to an angular asymmetry in the neutrino emission. For low magnetic fields, the Landau levels have almost no effect on the cooling. However, as the field strength increases, the electron chemical potential increases resulting in a lower density at which Urca pairs can exist. For intermediate field strength, there is an interesting interference between the Landau level distribution and the Fermi distribution. For high enough field strength, the entire electron energy spectrum is eventually confined to a single Landau level producing dramatic spikes in the emission spectrum.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
2108339 2020275
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10381846
Journal Name:
The Astrophysical Journal
Volume:
940
Issue:
2
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
Article No. 108
ISSN:
0004-637X
Publisher:
DOI PREFIX: 10.3847
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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