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Title: Spectroscopic evidence of flat bands in breathing kagome semiconductor Nb3I8
Abstract Kagome materials have become solid grounds to study the interplay among geometry, topology, correlation, and magnetism. Recently, niobium halide semiconductors Nb 3 X 8 ( X  = Cl, Br, I) have been predicted to be two-dimensional magnets and these materials are also interesting for their breathing kagome geometry. However, experimental electronic structure studies of these promising materials are still lacking. Here, we report the spectroscopic evidence of flat and weakly dispersing bands in breathing-kagome semiconductor Nb 3 I 8 around 500 meV binding energy, which is well supported by our first-principles calculations. These bands originate from the breathing kagome lattice of niobium atoms and have niobium d -orbital character. They are found to be sensitive to the polarization of the incident photon beam. Our study provides insight into the electronic structure and flat band topology in an exfoliable kagome semiconductor, thereby providing an important platform to understand the interaction of geometry and electron correlations in two-dimensional materials.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1847962 1719797 2121953
NSF-PAR ID:
10391382
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Communications Materials
Volume:
3
Issue:
1
ISSN:
2662-4443
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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Fig. 3(b) shows the tunneling probability T according to the Kane two-band model in the three materials, In0.53Ga0.47As, GaAs, and GaN, following our observation of a similar electroluminescence mechanism in GaN/AlN RTDs (due to strong polarization field of wurtzite structures) [8]. The expression is Tinter = (2/9)∙exp[(-2 ∙Ug 2 ∙me)/(2h∙P∙E)], where Ug is the bandgap energy, P is the valence-to-conduction-band momentum matrix element, and E is the electric field. Values for the highest calculated internal E fields for the InGaAs and GaN are also shown, indicating that Tinter in those structures approaches values of ~10-5. As shown, a GaAs RTD would require an internal field of ~6×105 V/cm, which is rarely realized in standard GaAs RTDs, perhaps explaining why there have been few if any reports of room-temperature electroluminescence in the GaAs devices. [1] E.R. Brown,et al., Appl. Phys. Lett., vol. 58, 2291, 1991. [5] S. Sze, Physics of Semiconductor Devices, 2nd Ed. 12.2.1 (Wiley, 1981). [2] M. Feiginov et al., Appl. Phys. Lett., 99, 233506, 2011. [6] L. Coldren, Diode Lasers and Photonic Integrated Circuits, (Wiley, 1995). [3] Y. Nishida et al., Nature Sci. Reports, 9, 18125, 2019. [7] E.O. Kane, J. of Appl. Phy 32, 83 (1961). [4] P. Fakhimi, et al., 2019 DRC Conference Digest. [8] T. Growden, et al., Nature Light: Science & Applications 7, 17150 (2018). [5] S. Sze, Physics of Semiconductor Devices, 2nd Ed. 12.2.1 (Wiley, 1981). [6] L. Coldren, Diode Lasers and Photonic Integrated Circuits, (Wiley, 1995). [7] E.O. Kane, J. of Appl. Phy 32, 83 (1961). [8] T. Growden, et al., Nature Light: Science & Applications 7, 17150 (2018). 
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