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Title: Memristor Based Federated Learning for Network Security on the Edge using Processing in Memory (PIM) Computing
Artificial Intelligence (AI) is moving towards the edge. Training an AI model for edge computing on a centralized server increases latency, and the privacy of edge users is jeopardized due to private data transfer through a less secure communication channels. Additionally, existing high-power computing systems are battling with memory and data transfer bottlenecks between the processor and memory. Federated Learning (FL) is a collaborative AI learning paradigm for distributed local devices that operates without transferring local data. Local participant devices share the updated network parameters with the central server instead of sending the original data. The central server updates the global AI model and deploys the model to the local clients. As the local data resides only on the edge, these devices need to be protected from cyberattacks. The Federated Intrusion Detection System (FIDS) could be a viable system to protect edge devices as opposed to a centralized protection system. However, on-device training of the model in resource constrained devices may suffer from excessive power drain, in addition to memory and area overhead. In this work we present a memristor based system for AI training on edge devices. Memristor devices are ideal candidates for processing in memory, as their dynamic resistance properties allow them to perform multiply-add operations in parallel in the analog domain with extreme efficiency. Alternatively, existing CMOS-based PIM systems are typically developed for edge inference based on pretrained weights, and are not equipped for on-chip training. We show the effectiveness of the system, where successful learning and recognition is achieved completely within edge devices. The classification accuracy of the memristor system shows negligible loss when compared a software implementation. To the best of our knowledge, this first demonstration of a memristor based federated learning system. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this system as an intrusion detection platform for edge devices, although given the flexibility of the learning algorithm, it could be used to enhance many types of on board leaning and classification applications.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1718633
NSF-PAR ID:
10391561
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
2022 International Joint Conference on Neural Networks (IJCNN)
Page Range / eLocation ID:
1 to 8
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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