skip to main content


Title: Detecting Corrupted Labels Without Training a Model to Predict
Label noise in real-world datasets encodes wrong correlation patterns and impairs the generalization of deep neural networks (DNNs). It is critical to find efficient ways to detect corrupted patterns. Current methods primarily focus on designing robust training techniques to prevent DNNs from memorizing corrupted patterns. These approaches often require customized training processes and may overfit corrupted patterns, leading to a performance drop in detection. In this paper, from a more data-centric perspective, we propose a training-free solution to detect corrupted labels. Intuitively, ``closer'' instances are more likely to share the same clean label. Based on the neighborhood information, we propose two methods: the first one uses ``local voting" via checking the noisy label consensuses of nearby features. The second one is a ranking-based approach that scores each instance and filters out a guaranteed number of instances that are likely to be corrupted. We theoretically analyze how the quality of features affects the local voting and provide guidelines for tuning neighborhood size. We also prove the worst-case error bound for the ranking-based method. Experiments with both synthetic and real-world label noise demonstrate our training-free solutions consistently and significantly improve most of the training-based baselines.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
2007951 2143895
NSF-PAR ID:
10391574
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
International Conference on Machine Learning
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
More Like this
  1. null (Ed.)
    Human-annotated labels are often prone to noise, and the presence of such noise will degrade the performance of the resulting deep neural network (DNN) models. Much of the literature (with several recent exceptions) of learning with noisy labels focuses on the case when the label noise is independent of features. Practically, annotations errors tend to be instance-dependent and often depend on the difficulty levels of recognizing a certain task. Applying existing results from instance-independent settings would require a significant amount of estimation of noise rates. Therefore, providing theoretically rigorous solutions for learning with instance-dependent label noise remains a challenge. In this paper, we propose CORES (COnfidence REgularized Sample Sieve), which progressively sieves out corrupted examples. The implementation of CORES does not require specifying noise rates and yet we are able to provide theoretical guarantees of CORES in filtering out the corrupted examples. This high-quality sample sieve allows us to treat clean examples and the corrupted ones separately in training a DNN solution, and such a separation is shown to be advantageous in the instance-dependent noise setting. We demonstrate the performance of CORES^2 on CIFAR10 and CIFAR100 datasets with synthetic instance-dependent label noise and Clothing1M with real-world human noise. As of independent interests, our sample sieve provides a generic machinery for anatomizing noisy datasets and provides a flexible interface for various robust training techniques to further improve the performance. Code is available at https://github.com/UCSC-REAL/cores. 
    more » « less
  2. The eXtreme Multi-label Classification (XMC) problem seeks to find relevant labels from an exceptionally large label space. Most of the existing XMC learners focus on the extraction of semantic features from input query text. However, conventional XMC studies usually neglect the side information of instances and labels, which can be of use in many real-world applications such as recommendation systems and e-commerce product search. We propose Predicted Instance Neighborhood Aggregation (PINA), a data enhancement method for the general XMC problem that leverages beneficial side information. Unlike most existing XMC frameworks that treat labels and input instances as featureless indicators and independent entries, PINA extracts information from the label metadata and the correlations among training instances. Extensive experimental results demonstrate the consistent gain of PINA on various XMC tasks compared to the state-of-the-art methods: PINA offers a gain in accuracy compared to standard XR-Transformers on five public benchmark datasets. Moreover, PINA achieves a ∼ 5% gain in accuracy on the largest dataset LF-AmazonTitles-1.3M. Our implementation is publicly available https://github.com/amzn/pecos/ tree/mainline/examples/pina. 
    more » « less
  3. Noisy labels can significantly affect the performance of deep neural networks (DNNs). In medical image segmentation tasks, annotations are error-prone due to the high demand in annotation time and in the annotators' expertise. Existing methods mostly tackle label noise in classification tasks. Their independent-noise assumptions do not fit label noise in segmentation task. In this paper, we propose a novel noise model for segmentation problems that encodes spatial correlation and bias, which are prominent in segmentation annotations. Further, to mitigate such label noise, we propose a label correction method to recover true label progressively. We provide theoretical guarantees of the correctness of the proposed method. Experiments show that our approach outperforms current state-of-the-art methods on both synthetic and real-world noisy annotations. 
    more » « less
  4. Noisy labels can significantly affect the performance of deep neural networks (DNNs). In medical image segmentation tasks, annotations are error-prone due to the high demand in annotation time and in the annotators' expertise. Existing methods mostly tackle label noise in classification tasks. Their independent-noise assumptions do not fit label noise in segmentation task. In this paper, we propose a novel noise model for segmentation problems that encodes spatial correlation and bias, which are prominent in segmentation annotations. Further, to mitigate such label noise, we propose a label correction method to recover true label progressively. We provide theoretical guarantees of the correctness of the proposed method. Experiments show that our approach outperforms current state-of-the-art methods on both synthetic and real-world noisy annotations. 
    more » « less
  5. Imperfect labels are ubiquitous in real-world datasets. Several recent successful methods for training deep neural networks (DNNs) robust to label noise have used two primary techniques: filtering samples based on loss during a warm-up phase to curate an initial set of cleanly labeled samples, and using the output of a network as a pseudo-label for subsequent loss calculations. In this paper, we evaluate different augmentation strategies for algorithms tackling the "learning with noisy labels" problem. We propose and examine multiple augmentation strategies and evaluate them using synthetic datasets based on CIFAR-10 and CIFAR-100, as well as on the real-world dataset Clothing1M. Due to several commonalities in these algorithms, we find that using one set of augmentations for loss modeling tasks and another set for learning is the most effective, improving results on the state-of-the-art and other previous methods. Furthermore, we find that applying augmentation during the warm-up period can negatively impact the loss convergence behavior of correctly versus incorrectly labeled samples. We introduce this augmentation strategy to the state-of-the-art technique and demonstrate that we can improve performance across all evaluated noise levels. In particular, we improve accuracy on the CIFAR-10 benchmark at 90% symmetric noise by more than 15% in absolute accuracy, and we also improve performance on the Clothing1M dataset. 
    more » « less