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Title: User-focused evaluation of National Ecological Observatory Network streamflow estimates
Abstract

Accurately estimating stream discharge is crucial for many ecological, biogeochemical, and hydrologic analyses. As of September 2022, The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) provided up to 5 years of continuous discharge estimates at 28 streams across the United States. NEON created rating curves at each site in a Bayesian framework, parameterized using hydraulic controls and manual measurements of discharge. Here we evaluate the reliability of these discharge estimates with three approaches. We (1) compared predicted to observed discharge, (2) compared predicted to observed stage, and (3) calculated the proportion of discharge estimates extrapolated beyond field measurements. We considered 1,523 site-months of continuous streamflow predictions published by NEON. Of these, 39% met our highest quality criteria, 11% fell into an intermediate classification, and 50% of site-months were classified as unreliable. We provided diagnostic metrics and categorical evaluations of continuous discharge and stage estimates by month for each site, enabling users to rapidly query for suitable NEON data.

 
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Award ID(s):
2106071 1926420 1442439
NSF-PAR ID:
10396570
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ;
Publisher / Repository:
Nature Publishing Group
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Scientific Data
Volume:
10
Issue:
1
ISSN:
2052-4463
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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We also used the Tukey–Kramer method to compare the frequency distributions of TDP concentrations in all of the soil leachate samples with concentrations in lakes, streams, and groundwater wells, since each sample category had very different numbers of measurements. Individual spreadsheets in “data table_leaching_dissolved organic carbon and nitrogen.xls” 1.    annual precip_drainage 2.    biomass_corn, perennial grasses 3.    biomass_poplar 4.    annual N leaching _vol-wtd conc 5.    Summary_N leached 6.    annual DOC leachin_vol-wtd conc 7.    growing season length 8.    correlation_nh4 VS no3 9.    correlations_don VS no3_doc VS don Each spreadsheet is described below along with an explanation of variates. Note that ‘nan’ indicate data are missing or not available. First row indicates header; second row indicates units 1. Spreadsheet: annual precip_drainage Description: Precipitation measured from nearby Kellogg Biological Station (KBS) Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) Weather station, over 2009-2016 study period. Data shown in Figure 1; original data source for precipitation (https://lter.kbs.msu.edu/datatables/7). Drainage estimated from SALUS crop model. Note that drainage is percolation out of the root zone (0-125 cm). Annual precipitation and drainage values shown here are calculated for growing and non-growing crop periods. Variate    Description year    year of the observation crop    “corn” “switchgrass” “miscanthus” “nativegrass” “restored prairie” “poplar” precip_G    precipitation during growing period (milliMeter) precip_NG    precipitation during non-growing period (milliMeter) drainage_G    drainage during growing period (milliMeter) drainage_NG    drainage during non-growing period (milliMeter)      2. Spreadsheet: biomass_corn, perennial grasses Description: Maximum aboveground biomass measurements from corn, switchgrass, miscanthus, native grass and restored prairie plots in Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center (GLBRC) Biomass Cropping System Experiment (BCSE) during 2009-2015. Data shown in Figure 2.   Variate    Description year    year of the observation date    day of the observation (mm/dd/yyyy) crop    “corn” “switchgrass” “miscanthus” “nativegrass” “restored prairie” “poplar” replicate    each crop has four replicated plots, R1, R2, R3 and R4 station    stations (S1, S2 and S3) of samplings within the plot. For more details, refer to link (https://data.sustainability.glbrc.org/protocols/156) species    plant species that are rooted within the quadrat during the time of maximum biomass harvest. See protocol for more information, refer to link (http://lter.kbs.msu.edu/datatables/36) For maize biomass, grain and whole biomass reported in the paper (weed biomass or surface litter are excluded). Surface litter biomass not included in any crops; weed biomass not included in switchgrass and miscanthus, but included in grass mixture and prairie. fraction    Fraction of biomass biomass_plot    biomass per plot on dry-weight basis (Grams_Per_SquareMeter) biomass_ha    biomass (megaGrams_Per_Hectare) by multiplying column biomass per plot with 0.01 3. Spreadsheet: biomass_poplar Description: Maximum aboveground biomass measurements from poplar plots in Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center (GLBRC) Biomass Cropping System Experiment (BCSE) during 2009-2015. Data shown in Figure 2. Note that poplar biomass was estimated from crop growth curves until the poplar was harvested in the winter of 2013-14. Variate    Description year    year of the observation method    methods of poplar biomass sampling date    day of the observation (mm/dd/yyyy) replicate    each crop has four replicated plots, R1, R2, R3 and R4 diameter_at_ground    poplar diameter (milliMeter) at the ground diameter_at_15cm    poplar diameter (milliMeter) at 15 cm height biomass_tree    biomass per plot (Grams_Per_Tree) biomass_ha    biomass (megaGrams_Per_Hectare) by multiplying biomass per tree with 0.01 4. Spreadsheet: annual N leaching_vol-wtd conc Description: Annual leaching rate (kiloGrams_N_Per_Hectare) and volume-weighted mean N concentrations (milliGrams_N_Per_Liter) of nitrate (no3) and dissolved organic nitrogen (don) in the leachate samples collected from corn, switchgrass, miscanthus, native grass, restored prairie and poplar plots in Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center (GLBRC) Biomass Cropping System Experiment (BCSE) during 2009-2016. Data for nitrogen leached and volume-wtd mean N concentration shown in Figure 3a and Figure 3b, respectively. Note that ammonium (nh4) concentration were much lower and often undetectable (<0.07 milliGrams_N_Per_Liter). Also note that in 2009 and 2010 crop-years, data from some replicates are missing.    Variate    Description crop    “corn” “switchgrass” “miscanthus” “nativegrass” “restored prairie” “poplar” crop-year    year of the observation replicate    each crop has four replicated plots, R1, R2, R3 and R4 no3 leached    annual leaching rates of nitrate (kiloGrams_N_Per_Hectare) don leached    annual leaching rates of don (kiloGrams_N_Per_Hectare) vol-wtd no3 conc.    Volume-weighted mean no3 concentration (milliGrams_N_Per_Liter) vol-wtd don conc.    Volume-weighted mean don concentration (milliGrams_N_Per_Liter) 5. Spreadsheet: summary_N leached Description: Summary of total amount and forms of N leached (kiloGrams_N_Per_Hectare) and the percent of applied N lost to leaching over the seven years for corn, switchgrass, miscanthus, native grass, restored prairie and poplar plots in Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center (GLBRC) Biomass Cropping System Experiment (BCSE) during 2009-2016. Data for nitrogen amount leached shown in Figure 4a and percent of applied N lost shown in Figure 4b. Note the fraction of unleached N includes in harvest, accumulation in root biomass, soil organic matter or gaseous N emissions were not measured in the study. Variate    Description crop    “corn” “switchgrass” “miscanthus” “nativegrass” “restored prairie” “poplar” no3 leached    annual leaching rates of nitrate (kiloGrams_N_Per_Hectare) don leached    annual leaching rates of don (kiloGrams_N_Per_Hectare) N unleached    N unleached (kiloGrams_N_Per_Hectare) in other sources are not studied % of N applied N lost to leaching    % of N applied N lost to leaching 6. Spreadsheet: annual DOC leachin_vol-wtd conc Description: Annual leaching rate (kiloGrams_Per_Hectare) and volume-weighted mean N concentrations (milliGrams_Per_Liter) of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in the leachate samples collected from corn, switchgrass, miscanthus, native grass, restored prairie and poplar plots in Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center (GLBRC) Biomass Cropping System Experiment (BCSE) during 2009-2016. Data for DOC leached and volume-wtd mean DOC concentration shown in Figure 5a and Figure 5b, respectively. Note that in 2009 and 2010 crop-years, water samples were not available for DOC measurements.     Variate    Description crop    “corn” “switchgrass” “miscanthus” “nativegrass” “restored prairie” “poplar” crop-year    year of the observation replicate    each crop has four replicated plots, R1, R2, R3 and R4 doc leached    annual leaching rates of nitrate (kiloGrams_Per_Hectare) vol-wtd doc conc.    volume-weighted mean doc concentration (milliGrams_Per_Liter) 7. Spreadsheet: growing season length Description: Growing season length (days) of corn, switchgrass, miscanthus, native grass, restored prairie and poplar plots in the Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center (GLBRC) Biomass Cropping System Experiment (BCSE) during 2009-2015. Date shown in Figure S2. Note that growing season is from the date of planting or emergence to the date of harvest (or leaf senescence in case of poplar).   Variate    Description crop    “corn” “switchgrass” “miscanthus” “nativegrass” “restored prairie” “poplar” year    year of the observation growing season length    growing season length (days) 8. Spreadsheet: correlation_nh4 VS no3 Description: Correlation of ammonium (nh4+) and nitrate (no3-) concentrations (milliGrams_N_Per_Liter) in the leachate samples from corn, switchgrass, miscanthus, native grass, restored prairie and poplar plots in Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center (GLBRC) Biomass Cropping System Experiment (BCSE) during 2013-2015. Data shown in Figure S3. Note that nh4+ concentration in the leachates was very low compared to no3- and don concentration and often undetectable in three crop-years (2013-2015) when measurements are available. Variate    Description crop    “corn” “switchgrass” “miscanthus” “nativegrass” “restored prairie” “poplar” date    date of the observation (mm/dd/yyyy) replicate    each crop has four replicated plots, R1, R2, R3 and R4 nh4 conc    nh4 concentration (milliGrams_N_Per_Liter) no3 conc    no3 concentration (milliGrams_N_Per_Liter)   9. Spreadsheet: correlations_don VS no3_doc VS don Description: Correlations of don and nitrate concentrations (milliGrams_N_Per_Liter); and doc (milliGrams_Per_Liter) and don concentrations (milliGrams_N_Per_Liter) in the leachate samples of corn, switchgrass, miscanthus, native grass, restored prairie and poplar plots in Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center (GLBRC) Biomass Cropping System Experiment (BCSE) during 2013-2015. Data of correlation of don and nitrate concentrations shown in Figure S4 a and doc and don concentrations shown in Figure S4 b. Variate    Description crop    “corn” “switchgrass” “miscanthus” “nativegrass” “restored prairie” “poplar” year    year of the observation don    don concentration (milliGrams_N_Per_Liter) no3     no3 concentration (milliGrams_N_Per_Liter) doc    doc concentration (milliGrams_Per_Liter) 
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  2. Abstract

    Measuring forest biodiversity using terrestrial surveys is expensive and can only capture common species abundance in large heterogeneous landscapes. In contrast, combining airborne imagery with computer vision can generate individual tree data at the scales of hundreds of thousands of trees. To train computer vision models, ground‐based species labels are combined with airborne reflectance data. Due to the difficulty of finding rare species in a large landscape, many classification models only include the most abundant species, leading to biased predictions at broad scales. For example, if only common species are used to train the model, this assumes that these samples are representative across the entire landscape. Extending classification models to include rare species requires targeted data collection and algorithmic improvements to overcome large data imbalances between dominant and rare taxa. We use a targeted sampling workflow to the Ordway Swisher Biological Station within the US National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON), where traditional forestry plots had identified six canopy tree species with more than 10 individuals at the site. Combining iterative model development with rare species sampling, we extend a training dataset to include 14 species. Using a multi‐temporal hierarchical model, we demonstrate the ability to include species predicted at <1% frequency in landscape without losing performance on the dominant species. The final model has over 75% accuracy for 14 species with improved rare species classification compared to 61% accuracy of a baseline deep learning model. After filtering out dead trees, we generate landscape species maps of individual crowns for over 670 000 individual trees. We find distinct patches of forest composed of rarer species at the full‐site scale, highlighting the importance of capturing species diversity in training data. We estimate the relative abundance of 14 species within the landscape and provide three measures of uncertainty to generate a range of counts for each species. For example, we estimate that the dominant species,Pinus palustrisaccounts for c. 28% of predicted stems, with models predicting a range of counts between 160 000 and 210 000 individuals. These maps provide the first estimates of canopy tree diversity within a NEON site to include rare species and provide a blueprint for capturing tree diversity using airborne computer vision at broad scales.

     
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  3. Abstract Aim

    One of the primary characteristics that determines the structure and function of marine food webs is the utilization and prominence of energy‐rich lipids. The biogeographical pattern of lipids throughout the ocean delineates the marine “lipidscape,” which supports lipid‐rich fish, mammal, and seabird communities. While the importance of lipids is well appreciated, there are no synoptic measurements or biogeographical estimates of the marine lipidscape. Productive lipid‐rich food webs in the pelagic ocean depend on the critical diapause stage of large pelagic copepods, which integrate lipid production from phytoplankton, concentrating it in space and time, and making it available to upper trophic levels as particularly energy‐rich wax esters. As an important first step towards mapping the marine lipidscape, we compared four different modelling approaches of copepodid diapause, each representing different underlying hypotheses, and evaluated them against global datasets.

    Location

    Global Ocean.

    Taxon

    Copepoda.

    Methods

    Through a series of global model runs and data comparisons, we demonstrated the potential for regional studies to be extended to estimate global biogeographical patterns of diapause. We compared four modelling approaches each designed from a different perspective: life history, physiology, trait‐based community ecology, and empirical relationships. We compared the resulting biogeographical patterns and evaluated the model results against global measurements of copepodid diapause.

    Results

    Models were able to resolve more than just the latitudinal pattern of diapause (i.e. increased diapause prevalence near the poles), but to also pick up a diversity of regions where diapause occurs, such as coastal upwelling zones and seasonal seas. The life history model provided the best match to global observations. The predicted global biogeographical patterns, combined with carbon flux estimates, suggested a lower bound of 0.031–0.25 Pg C yr−1of downward flux associated with copepodid diapause.

    Main conclusions

    Results indicated a promising path forward for representing a detailed biogeography of the marine lipidscape and its associated carbon flux in global ecosystem and climate models. While complex models may offer advantages in terms of reproducing details of community structure, simpler theoretically based models appeared to best reproduce broad‐scale biogeographical patterns and showed the best correlation with observed biogeographical patterns.

     
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  5. Abstract

    The NeonTreeCrowns dataset is a set of individual level crown estimates for 100 million trees at 37 geographic sites across the United States surveyed by the National Ecological Observation Network’s Airborne Observation Platform. Each rectangular bounding box crown prediction includes height, crown area, and spatial location. 

    How can I see the data?

    A web server to look through predictions is available through idtrees.org

    Dataset Organization

    The shapefiles.zip contains 11,000 shapefiles, each corresponding to a 1km^2 RGB tile from NEON (ID: DP3.30010.001). For example "2019_SOAP_4_302000_4100000_image.shp" are the predictions from "2019_SOAP_4_302000_4100000_image.tif" available from the NEON data portal: https://data.neonscience.org/data-products/explore?search=camera. NEON's file convention refers to the year of data collection (2019), the four letter site code (SOAP), the sampling event (4), and the utm coordinate of the top left corner (302000_4100000). For NEON site abbreviations and utm zones see https://www.neonscience.org/field-sites/field-sites-map. 

    The predictions are also available as a single csv for each file. All available tiles for that site and year are combined into one large site. These data are not projected, but contain the utm coordinates for each bounding box (left, bottom, right, top). For both file types the following fields are available:

    Height: The crown height measured in meters. Crown height is defined as the 99th quartile of all canopy height pixels from a LiDAR height model (ID: DP3.30015.001)

    Area: The crown area in m2 of the rectangular bounding box.

    Label: All data in this release are "Tree".

    Score: The confidence score from the DeepForest deep learning algorithm. The score ranges from 0 (low confidence) to 1 (high confidence)

    How were predictions made?

    The DeepForest algorithm is available as a python package: https://deepforest.readthedocs.io/. Predictions were overlaid on the LiDAR-derived canopy height model. Predictions with heights less than 3m were removed.

    How were predictions validated?

    Please see

    Weinstein, B. G., Marconi, S., Bohlman, S. A., Zare, A., & White, E. P. (2020). Cross-site learning in deep learning RGB tree crown detection. Ecological Informatics56, 101061.

    Weinstein, B., Marconi, S., Aubry-Kientz, M., Vincent, G., Senyondo, H., & White, E. (2020). DeepForest: A Python package for RGB deep learning tree crown delineation. bioRxiv.

    Weinstein, Ben G., et al. "Individual tree-crown detection in RGB imagery using semi-supervised deep learning neural networks." Remote Sensing 11.11 (2019): 1309.

    Were any sites removed?

    Several sites were removed due to poor NEON data quality. GRSM and PUUM both had lower quality RGB data that made them unsuitable for prediction. NEON surveys are updated annually and we expect future flights to correct these errors. We removed the GUIL puerto rico site due to its very steep topography and poor sunangle during data collection. The DeepForest algorithm responded poorly to predicting crowns in intensely shaded areas where there was very little sun penetration. We are happy to make these data are available upon request.

    # Contact

    We welcome questions, ideas and general inquiries. The data can be used for many applications and we look forward to hearing from you. Contact ben.weinstein@weecology.org. 

    Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation: GBMF4563 
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