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Title: On the synthesis and characterization of bimagnetic CoO/NiFe 2 O 4 heterostructured nanoparticles
Bimagnetic nanoparticles show promise for applications in energy efficient magnetic storage media and magnetic device applications. The magnetic properties, including the exchange bias of nanostructured materials can be tuned by variation of the size, composition, and morphology of the core vs overlayer of the nanoparticles (NPs). The purpose of this study is to investigate the optimal synthesis routes, structure and magnetic properties of novel CoO/NiFe 2 O 4 heterostructured nanocrystals (HNCs). In this work, we aim to examine how the size impacts the exchange bias, coercivity and other magnetic properties of the CoO/NiFe 2 O 4 HNCs. The nanoparticles with sizes ranging from 10 nm to 24 nm were formed by synthesis of an antiferromagnetic (AFM) CoO core and deposition of a ferrimagnetic (FiM) NiFe 2 O 4 overlayer. A highly crystalline magnetic phase is more likely to occur when the morphology of the core-overgrowth is present, which enhances the coupling at the AFM-FiM interface. The CoO core NPs are prepared using thermal decomposition of Co(OH) 2 at 600 °C for 2 hours in a pure argon atmosphere, whereas the HNCs are obtained first using thermal evaporation followed by hydrothermal synthesis. The structural and morphological characterization made using X-ray diffraction (XRD), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques verifies that the HNCs are comprised of a CoO core and a NiFe 2 O 4 overgrowth phase. Rietveld refinement of the XRD data shows that the CoO core has the rocksalt (Fd3 m) crystal structure and the NiFe 2 O 4 overgrowth has the spinel (C12/m1) crystal structure. SEM-EDS data indicates the presence and uniform distribution of Co, Ni and Fe in the HNCs. The results from PPMS magnetization measurements of the CoO/NiFe 2 O 4 HNCs are discussed herein.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1719875
NSF-PAR ID:
10411650
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
AIP Advances
Volume:
13
Issue:
2
ISSN:
2158-3226
Page Range / eLocation ID:
025314
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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