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This content will become publicly available on May 15, 2024

Title: Ultrafast, room temperature rejuvenation of SiC Schottky diodes from forward current-induced degradation
In this work, we demonstrate the rejuvenation of Ti/4H-SiC Schottky barrier diodes after forward current-induced degradation, at room temperature and in a few seconds, by exploiting the physics of high-energy electron interactions with defects. The diodes were intentionally degraded to a 42% decrease in forward current and a 9% increase in leakage current through accelerated electrical stressing. The key feature of our proposed rejuvenation process is very high current density electrical pulsing with low frequency and duty cycle to suppress any temperature rise. The primary stimulus is, therefore, the electron wind force, which is derived from the loss of the momentum of the high energy electrons upon collision with the defects. Such defect-specific or “just in location” mobilization of atoms allows a significant decrease in defect concentration, which is not possible with conventional thermal annealing that requires higher temperatures and longer times. We show evidence of rejuvenation with additional improvement in leakage current (16%) and forward current (38%) beyond the pristine condition. Transmission electron microscopy, geometric phase analysis, Raman spectroscopy, and energy dispersive x-ray-spectroscopy reveal the enhancement of defects and interfaces. The ultrafast and room temperature process has the potential for rejuvenating electronic devices operating in high power and harsh environmental conditions.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1856662
NSF-PAR ID:
10413463
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Applied Physics Letters
Volume:
122
Issue:
20
ISSN:
0003-6951
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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