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Title: CEU-Net: ensemble semantic segmentation of hyperspectral images using clustering
Abstract Most semantic segmentation approaches of big data hyperspectral images use and require preprocessing steps in the form of patching to accurately classify diversified land cover in remotely sensed images. These approaches use patching to incorporate the rich spatial neighborhood information in images and exploit the simplicity and segmentability of the most common datasets. In contrast, most landmasses in the world consist of overlapping and diffused classes, making neighborhood information weaker than what is seen in common datasets. To combat this common issue and generalize the segmentation models to more complex and diverse hyperspectral datasets, in this work, we propose a novel flagship model: Clustering Ensemble U-Net. Our model uses the ensemble method to combine spectral information extracted from convolutional neural network training on a cluster of landscape pixels. Our model outperforms existing state-of-the-art hyperspectral semantic segmentation methods and gets competitive performance with and without patching when compared to baseline models. We highlight our model’s high performance across six popular hyperspectral datasets including Kennedy Space Center, Houston, and Indian Pines, then compare them to current top-performing models.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1920908
NSF-PAR ID:
10418240
Author(s) / Creator(s):
;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Journal of Big Data
Volume:
10
Issue:
1
ISSN:
2196-1115
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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