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Title: Co-occurrence of Aquatic Heatwaves with Atmospheric Heatwaves, Low Dissolved Oxygen, and Low pH Events in Estuarine Ecosystems
Award ID(s):
1832221
NSF-PAR ID:
10422882
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Estuaries and Coasts
Volume:
45
Issue:
3
ISSN:
1559-2723
Page Range / eLocation ID:
707 to 720
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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  1. Abstract

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