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This content will become publicly available on June 30, 2024

Title: Improving metrology with quantum scrambling
Quantum scrambling, the distribution of information across a quantum system, can enhance precision measurements.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
2016244 2012023
NSF-PAR ID:
10431132
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Science
Volume:
380
Issue:
6652
ISSN:
0036-8075
Page Range / eLocation ID:
1381 to 1384
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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