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Title: SHMEM-ML: Leveraging OpenSHMEM and Apache Arrow for Scalable, Composable Machine Learning
SHMEM-ML is a domain specific library for distributed array computations and machine learning model training & inference. Like other projects at the intersection of machine learning and HPC (e.g. dask, Arkouda, Legate Numpy), SHMEM-ML aims to leverage the performance of the HPC software stack to accelerate machine learning workflows. However, it differs in a number of ways. First, SHMEM-ML targets the full machine learning workflow, not just model training. It supports a general purpose nd-array abstraction commonly used in Python machine learning applications, and efficiently distributes transformation and manipulation of this ndarray across the full system. Second, SHMEM-ML uses OpenSHMEM as its underlying communication layer, enabling high performance networking across hundreds or thousands of distributed processes. While most past work in high performance machine learning has leveraged HPC message passing communication models as a way to efficiently exchange model gradient updates, SHMEM-ML’s focus on the full machine learning lifecycle means that a more flexible and adaptable communication model is needed to support both fine and coarse grain communication. Third, SHMEM-ML works to interoperate with the broader Python machine learning software ecosystem. While some frameworks aim to rebuild that ecosystem from scratch on top of the HPC software stack, SHMEM-ML is built on top of Apache Arrow, an in-memory standard for data formatting and data exchange between libraries. This enables SHMEM-ML to share data with other libraries without creating copies of data. This paper describes the design, implementation, and evaluation of SHMEM-ML – demonstrating a general purpose system for data transformation and manipulation while achieving up to a 38× speedup in distributed training performance relative to the industry standard Horovod framework without a regression in model metrics.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
2029004
NSF-PAR ID:
10432119
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ;
Editor(s):
Poole, Steve; Hernandez, Oscar; Baker, Matthew; Curtis, Tony
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Lecture notes in computer science
Volume:
13159
ISSN:
1611-3349
Page Range / eLocation ID:
111–125
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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