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Title: Numerical Simulation of Prefabricated Steel Stairs to be Implemented in the NHERI TallWood Building
During extreme events such as earthquakes, stairs are the primary means of egress in and out of buildings. Therefore, understanding the seismic response of this non-structural system is essential. Past earthquake events have shown that stairs with a flight to landing fixed connection are prone to damage due to the large interstory drift demand they are subjected to. To address this, resilient stair systems with drift-compatible connections have been proposed. These stair systems include stairs with fixed-free connections, sliding-slotted connections, and related drift-compatible detailing. Despite the availability of such details in design practice, they have yet to be implemented into full-scale, multi-floor building test programs. To conduct a system-level experimental study using true-to-field boundary conditions of these stair systems, several stair configurations are planned for integration within the NHERI TallWood 10-story mass timber building test program. The building is currently under construction at the UC San Diego 6-DOF Large High-Performance Outdoor Shake Table (LHPOST6). To facilitate pre-test investigation of the installed stair systems a comprehensive finite element model of stairs with various boundary conditions has been proposed and validated via comparison with experimental data available on like-detailed single-story specimens tested at the University of Nevada, Reno (UNR). The proposed modelling approach was used to develop the finite element model of a single-story, scissor-type, stair system with drift-compatible connections to be implemented in the NHERI TallWood building. This paper provides an overview, and pre-test numerical evaluation of the planned stair testing program within the mass timber shake table testing effort.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1635363
NSF-PAR ID:
10464684
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
ATC/SPONSE Fifth International Workshop on the Seismic Performance of Non-Structural Elements (SPONSE)
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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  4. Abstract

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  5. Summary

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