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Title: Roadmap for Unconventional Computing with Nanotechnology
In the Beyond Moore Law era, with increasing edge intelligence, domain-specific computing embracing unconventional approaches will become increasingly prevalent. At the same time, the adoption of a wide variety of nanotechnologies will offer benefits in energy cost, computational speed, reduced footprint, cyber-resilience and processing prowess. The time is ripe to lay out a roadmap for unconventional computing with nanotechnologies to guide future research and this collection aims to fulfill that need. The authors provide a comprehensive roadmap for neuromorphic computing with electron spins, memristive devices, two-dimensional nanomaterials, nanomagnets and assorted dynamical systems. They also address other paradigms such as Ising machines, Bayesian inference engines, probabilistic computing with p-bits, processing in memory, quantum memories and algorithms, computing with skyrmions and spin waves, and brain inspired computing for incremental learning and solving problems in severely resource constrained environments. All of these approaches have advantages over conventional Boolean computing predicated on the von-Neumann architecture. With the computational need for artificial intelligence growing at a rate 50x faster than Moore law for electronics, more unconventional approaches to computing and signal processing will appear on the horizon and this roadmap will aid in identifying future needs and challenges.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1910997
NSF-PAR ID:
10465748
Author(s) / Creator(s):
Date Published:
Journal Name:
arXivorg
ISSN:
2331-8422
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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    In conclusion, the SiO2memristors with different metallization were established. To tune the property of RS layer, the sputtering conditions of RS were varied. To investigate the influence of TE selections on switching performance of memristor, we integrated Cu, Ag and Cu/Ag alloy as TEs and compared the switch characteristics. Our encouraging results clearly demonstrate that SiO2with Cu/Ag is a promising memristor device with synaptic switching behavior in neuromorphic computing applications.

    Acknowledgement

    This work was supported by the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF) Award No. ECCS-1931088. S.L. and H.W.S. acknowledge the support from the Improvement of Measurement Standards and Technology for Mechanical Metrology (Grant No. 22011044) by KRISS.

    References

    [1] Younget al.,IEEE Computational Intelligence Magazine,vol. 13, no. 3, pp. 55-75, 2018.

    [2] Hadsellet al.,Journal of Field Robotics,vol. 26, no. 2, pp. 120-144, 2009.

    [3] Najafabadiet al.,Journal of Big Data,vol. 2, no. 1, p. 1, 2015.

    [4] Zhaoet al.,Applied Physics Reviews,vol. 7, no. 1, 2020.

    [5] Zidanet al.,Nature Electronics,vol. 1, no. 1, pp. 22-29, 2018.

    [6] Wulfet al.,SIGARCH Comput. Archit. News,vol. 23, no. 1, pp. 20–24, 1995.

    [7] Wilkes,SIGARCH Comput. Archit. News,vol. 23, no. 4, pp. 4–6, 1995.

    [8] Ielminiet al.,Nature Electronics,vol. 1, no. 6, pp. 333-343, 2018.

    [9] Changet al.,Nano Letters,vol. 10, no. 4, pp. 1297-1301, 2010.

    [10] Qinet al., Physica Status Solidi (RRL) - Rapid Research Letters, pssr.202200075R1, In press, 2022.

     
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