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Title: Exploring the Benefits and Challenges of Data Physicalization
Data physicalization has emerged as a new method to represent and interact with data physically rather than digitally. Physical representations afford visual analysis in comparable ways to traditional, desktop- based visualization by introducing new capabilities, such as facilitating tactile manipulation, accessible interactions, and immersion, that are beyond traditional 2D visualizations. However, physicalization has historically been a niche aspect of visualization research due to its unique challenges. This work discusses the current challenges and highlights three areas where data physicalization can aid existing research thrusts: broadening participation, supporting analytics, and promoting creative expression.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1764089 1764092
NSF-PAR ID:
10466161
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ;
Publisher / Repository:
ETIS
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Proceedings of ETIS 2022
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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