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This content will become publicly available on July 22, 2024

Title: Deformation Defects Characterization in Short-range Ordered CrCoNi using Fast Electron Detectors and 4D-STEM
Here, we introduce a novel defect imaging method based on the cepstral analysis of electron diffuse scattering using an Electron Microscope Pixel Array Detector (EMPAD) detector.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
2226495
NSF-PAR ID:
10472090
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ;
Publisher / Repository:
Oxford University Press
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Microscopy and Microanalysis
Volume:
29
Issue:
Supplement_1
ISSN:
1431-9276
Page Range / eLocation ID:
251 to 253
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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