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Title: Bridging the Gap between Spatial and Spectral Domains: A Unified Framework for Graph Neural Networks

Deep learning’s performance has been extensively recognized recently. Graph neural networks (GNNs) are designed to deal with graph-structural data that classical deep learning does not easily manage. Since most GNNs were created using distinct theories, direct comparisons are impossible. Prior research has primarily concentrated on categorizing existing models, with little attention paid to their intrinsic connections. The purpose of this study is to establish a unified framework that integrates GNNs based on spectral graph and approximation theory. The framework incorporates a strong integration between spatial- and spectral-based GNNs while tightly associating approaches that exist within each respective domain.

 
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Award ID(s):
1841520 1750911 1954376
NSF-PAR ID:
10493364
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publisher / Repository:
Association for Computing Machinery
Date Published:
Journal Name:
ACM Computing Surveys
Volume:
56
Issue:
5
ISSN:
0360-0300
Page Range / eLocation ID:
1 to 42
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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