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  1. Free, publicly-accessible full text available July 1, 2024
  2. Contrastive learning learns visual representations by enforcing feature consistency under different augmented views. In this work, we explore contrastive learning from a new perspective. Interestingly, we find that quantization, when properly engineered, can enhance the effectiveness of contrastive learning. To this end, we propose a novel contrastive learning framework, dubbed Contrastive Quant, to encourage feature consistency under both differently augmented inputs via various data transformations and differently augmented weights/activations via various quantization levels. Extensive experiments, built on top of two state-of-the-art contrastive learning methods SimCLR and BYOL, show that Contrastive Quant consistently improves the learned visual representation. 
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  3. Data augmentation (DA) is an essential technique for training state-of-the-art deep learning systems. In this paper, we empirically show that the standard data augmentation methods may introduce distribution shift and consequently hurt the performance on unaugmented data during inference. To alleviate this issue, we propose a simple yet effective approach, dubbed KeepAugment, to increase the fidelity of augmented images. The idea is to use the saliency map to detect important regions on the original images and preserve these informative regions during augmentation. This information-preserving strategy allows us to generate more faithful training examples. Empirically, we demonstrate that our method significantly improves upon a number of prior art data augmentation schemes, e.g. AutoAugment, Cutout, random erasing, achieving promising results on image classification, semi-supervised image classification, multi-view multi-camera tracking and object detection. 
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  6. Weight quantization for deep ConvNets has shown promising results for applications such as image classification and semantic segmentation and is especially important for applications where memory storage is limited. However, when aiming for quantization without accuracy degradation, different tasks may end up with different bitwidths. This creates complexity for software and hardware support and the complexity accumulates when one considers mixed-precision quantization, in which case each layer’s weights use a different bitwidth. Our key insight is that optimizing for the least bitwidth subject to no accuracy degradation is not necessarily an optimal strategy. This is because one cannot decide optimality between two bitwidths if one has smaller model size while the other has better accuracy. In this work, we take the first step to understand if some weight bitwidth is better than others by aligning all to the same model size using a width-multiplier. Under this setting, somewhat surprisingly, we show that using a single bitwidth for the whole network can achieve better accuracy compared to mixed-precision quantization targeting zero accuracy degradation when both have the same model size. In particular, our results suggest that when the number of channels becomes a target hyperparameter, a single weight bitwidth throughout the network shows superior results for model compression. 
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