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  1. Free, publicly-accessible full text available December 1, 2024
  2. We study the problem of maximizing a non-monotone submodular function subject to a cardinality constraint in the streaming model. Our main contribution is a single-pass (semi-)streaming algorithm that uses roughly $O(k / \varepsilon^2)$ memory, where $k$ is the size constraint. At the end of the stream, our algorithm post-processes its data structure using any offline algorithm for submodular maximization, and obtains a solution whose approximation guarantee is $\frac{\alpha}{1+\alpha}-\varepsilon$, where $\alpha$ is the approximation of the offline algorithm. If we use an exact (exponential time) post-processing algorithm, this leads to $\frac{1}{2}-\varepsilon$ approximation (which is nearly optimal). If we post-process with the algorithm of \cite{buchbinder2019constrained}, that achieves the state-of-the-art offline approximation guarantee of $\alpha=0.385$, we obtain $0.2779$-approximation in polynomial time, improving over the previously best polynomial-time approximation of $0.1715$ due to \cite{feldman2018less}. It is also worth mentioning that our algorithm is combinatorial and deterministic, which is rare for an algorithm for non-monotone submodular maximization, and enjoys a fast update time of $O(\frac{\log k + \log (1/\alpha {\varepsilon^2})$ per element. 
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  3. We propose subsampling as a unified algorithmic technique for submodular maximization in centralized and online settings. The idea is simple: independently sample elements from the ground set and use simple combinatorial techniques (such as greedy or local search) on these sampled elements. We show that this approach leads to optimal/state-of-the-art results despite being much simpler than existing methods. In the usual off-line setting, we present SampleGreedy, which obtains a [Formula: see text]-approximation for maximizing a submodular function subject to a p-extendible system using [Formula: see text] evaluation and feasibility queries, where k is the size of the largest feasible set. The approximation ratio improves to p + 1 and p for monotone submodular and linear objectives, respectively. In the streaming setting, we present Sample-Streaming, which obtains a [Formula: see text]-approximation for maximizing a submodular function subject to a p-matchoid using O(k) memory and [Formula: see text] evaluation and feasibility queries per element, and m is the number of matroids defining the p-matchoid. The approximation ratio improves to 4p for monotone submodular objectives. We empirically demonstrate the effectiveness of our algorithms on video summarization, location summarization, and movie recommendation tasks. 
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  6. We study the problem of maximizing a non-monotone submodular function subject to a cardinality constraint in the streaming model. Our main contributions are two single-pass (semi-)streaming algorithms that use $\tilde{O}(k)\cdot\mathrm{poly}(1/\varepsilon)$ memory, where $k$ is the size constraint. At the end of the stream, both our algorithms post-process their data structures using any offline algorithm for submodular maximization, and obtain a solution whose approximation guarantee is $\frac{\alpha}{1+\alpha}-\varepsilon$, where $\alpha$ is the approximation of the offline algorithm. If we use an exact (exponential time) post-processing algorithm, this leads to $\frac{1}{2}-\varepsilon$ approximation (which is nearly optimal). If we post-process with the algorithm of Buchbinder-Feldman '19, that achieves the state-of-the-art offline approximation guarantee of $\alpha=0.385$, we obtain $0.2779$-approximation in polynomial time, improving over the previously best polynomial-time approximation of $0.1715$ due to Feldman'18. One of our algorithms is combinatorial and enjoys fast update and overall running times. Our other algorithm is based on the multilinear extension, enjoys an improved space complexity, and can be made deterministic in some settings of interest. 
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