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  1. Koopman operators provide tractable means of learning linear approximations of non-linear dynamics. Many approaches have been proposed to find these operators, typically based upon approximations using an a-priori fixed class of models. However, choosing appropriate models and bounding the approximation error is far from trivial. Motivated by these difficulties, in this paper we propose an optimization based approach to learning Koopman operators from data. Our results show that the Koopman operator, the associated Hilbert space of observables and a suitable dictionary can be obtained by solving two rank-constrained semi-definite programs (SDP). While in principle these problems are NP-hard, the usemore »of standard relaxations of rank leads to convex SDPs.« less
  2. Despite the advances in Human Activity Recognition, the ability to exploit the dynamics of human body motion in videos has yet to be achieved. In numerous recent works, re- searchers have used appearance and motion as independent inputs to infer the action that is taking place in a specific video. In this paper, we highlight that while using a novel representation of human body motion, we can benefit from appearance and motion simultaneously. As a result, bet- ter performance of action recognition can be achieved. We start with a pose estimator to extract the location and heat- map of bodymore »joints in each frame. We use a dynamic encoder to generate a fixed size representation from these body joint heat-maps. Our experimental results show that training a convolutional neural network with the dynamic motion representation outperforms state-of-the-art action recognition models. By modeling distinguishable activities as distinct dynamical systems and with the help of two stream net- works, we obtain the best performance on HMDB, JHMDB, UCF-101, and AVA datasets.« less
  3. Semidefinite programs (SDPs) often arise in relaxations of some NP-hard problems, and if the solution of the SDP obeys certain rank constraints, the relaxation will be tight. Decomposition methods based on chordal sparsity have already been applied to speed up the solution of sparse SDPs, but methods for dealing with rank constraints are underdeveloped. This paper leverages a minimum rank completion result to decompose the rank constraint on a single large matrix into multiple rank constraints on a set of smaller matrices. The re-weighted heuristic is used as a proxy for rank, and the specific form of the heuristic preservesmore »the sparsity pattern between iterations. Implementations of rank-minimized SDPs through interior-point and first-order algorithms are discussed. The problem of subspace clustering is used to demonstrate the computational improvement of the proposed method.« less
  4. This paper addresses the problem of identification of error in variables switched linear models from experimental input/output data. This problem is known to be generically NP hard and thus computationally expensive to solve. To address this difficulty, several relaxations have been proposed in the past few years. While solvable in polynomial time these (convex) relaxations tend to scale poorly with the number of points and number/order of the subsystems, effectively limiting their applicability to scenarios with relatively small number of data points. To address this difficulty, in this paper we propose an efficient method that only requires performing (number ofmore »subsystems) singular value decompositions of matrices whose size is independent of the number of points. The underlying idea is to obtain a sum-of-squares polynomial approximation of the support of each subsystem one-at-a-time, and use these polynomials to segment the data into sets, each generated by a single subsystem. As shown in the paper, exploiting ideas from Christoffel's functions allows for finding these polynomial approximations simply by performing SVDs. The parameters of each subsystem can then be identified from the segmented data using existing error-in-variables (EIV) techniques.« less
  5. This paper proposes a data-driven framework to address the worst-case estimation problem for switched discrete-time linear systems based solely on the measured data (input & output) and an ℓ ∞ bound over the noise. We start with the problem of designing a worst-case optimal estimator for a single system and show that this problem can be recast as a rank minimization problem and efficiently solved using standard relaxations of rank. Then we extend these results to the switched case. Our main result shows that, when the mode variable is known, the problem can be solved proceeding in a similar manner.more »To address the case where the mode variable is unmeasurable, we impose the hybrid decoupling constraint(HDC) in order to reformulate the original problem as a polynomial optimization which can be reduced to a tractable convex optimization using moments-based techniques.« less
  6. In this paper we propose a data-driven fault detection framework for semi-supervised scenarios where labeled training data from the system under consideration (the “target”) is imbalanced (e.g. only relatively few labels are available from one of the classes), but data from a related system (the “source”) is readily available. An example of this situation is when a generic simulator is available, but needs to be tuned on a case-by-case basis to match the parameters of the actual system. The goal of this paper is to work with the statistical distribution of the data without necessitating system identification. Our main resultmore »shows that if the source and target domain are related by a linear transformation (a common assumption in domain adaptation), the problem of designing a classifier that minimizes a miss-classification loss over the joint source and target domains reduces to a convex optimization subject to a single (non-convex) equality constraint. This second-order equality constraint can be recast as a rank-1 optimization problem, where the rank constraint can be efficiently handled through a reweighted nuclear norm surrogate. These results are illustrated with a practical application: fault detection in additive manufacturing (industrial 3D printing). The proposed method is able to exploit simulation data (source domain) to substantially outperform classifiers tuned using only data from a single domain.« less