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  1. Accurately detecting, localizing, and tracking an unknown and time-varying number of dynamic targets using a team of mobile robots is a challenging problem that requires robots to reason about the uncertainties in their collected measurements. The problem is made more challenging when robots are uncertain about their own states, as this makes it difficult to both collectively localize targets and avoid collisions with one another. In this paper, we introduce the convex uncertain Voronoi (CUV) diagram, a generalization of the standard Voronoi diagram that accounts for the uncertain pose of each individual robot. We then use the CUV diagram to develop distributed multi-target tracking and coverage control algorithms that enable teams of mobile robots to account for bounded uncertainty in the location of each robot. Our algorithms are capable of safely driving mobile robots towards areas of high information distribution while maintaining coverage of the whole area of interest. We demonstrate the efficacy of these algorithms via a series of simulated and hardware tests, and compare the results to our previous work which assumes perfect localization. 
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    Free, publicly-accessible full text available December 1, 2024
  2. This article proposes a novel learning-based control policy with strong generalizability to new environments that enables a mobile robot to navigate autonomously through spaces filled with both static obstacles and dense crowds of pedestrians. The policy uses a unique combination of input data to generate the desired steering angle and forward velocity: a short history of lidar data, kinematic data about nearby pedestrians, and a subgoal point. The policy is trained in a reinforcement learning setting using a reward function that contains a novel term based on velocity obstacles to guide the robot to actively avoid pedestrians and move toward the goal. Through a series of 3-D simulated experiments with up to 55 pedestrians, this control policy is able to achieve a better balance between collision avoidance and speed (i.e., higher success rate and faster average speed) than state-of-the-art model-based and learning-based policies, and it also generalizes better to different crowd sizes and unseen environments. An extensive series of hardware experiments demonstrate the ability of this policy to directly work in different real-world environments with different crowd sizes with zero retraining. Furthermore, a series of simulated and hardware experiments show that the control policy also works in highly constrained static environments on a different robot platform without any additional training. Lastly, several important lessons that can be applied to other robot learning systems are summarized. 
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    Free, publicly-accessible full text available August 1, 2024
  3. Distributed multi-target tracking is a canonical task for multi-robot systems, encompassing applications from environmental monitoring to disaster response to surveillance. In many situations, the distribution of unknown objects in a search area is irregular, with objects are likely to distribute in clusters instead of evenly distributed. In this paper, we develop a novel distributed multi-robot multi-target tracking algorithm for effectively tracking clustered targets from noisy measurements. Our algorithm contains two major components. Firstly, both the instantaneous and cumulative target density are estimated, providing the best guess of current target states and long-term coarse distribution of clusters, respectively. Secondly, the power diagram is implemented in Lloyd’s algorithm to optimize task space assignment for each robot to trade-off between tracking detected targets in clusters and searching for potential targets outside clusters. We demonstrate the efficacy of our proposed method and show that our method outperforms of other candidates in tracking accuracy through a set of simulations. 
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  4. Three occupancy grid map (OGM) datasets for the paper titled "Stochastic Occupancy Grid Map Prediction in Dynamic Scenes" by Zhanteng Xie and Philip Dames 1. OGM-Turtlebot2: collected by a simulated Turtlebot2 with a maximum speed of 0.8 m/s navigates around a lobby Gazebo environment with 34 moving pedestrians using random start points and goal points 2. OGM-Jackal: extracted from two sub-datasets of the socially compliant navigation dataset (SCAND), which was collected by the Jackal robot with a maximum speed of 2.0 m/s at the outdoor environment of the UT Austin 3. OGM-Spot: extracted from two sub-datasets of the socially compliant navigation dataset (SCAND), which was collected by the Spot robot with a maximum speed of 1.6 m/s at the Union Building of the UT Austin The relevant code is available at: OGM prediction: https://github.com/TempleRAIL/SOGMP OGM mapping with GPU: https://github.com/TempleRAIL/occupancy_grid_mapping_torch 
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  5. This paper proposes a novel neural network-based control policy to enable a mobile robot to navigate safety through environments filled with both static obstacles, such as tables and chairs, and dense crowds of pedestrians. The network architecture uses early fusion to combine a short history of lidar data with kinematic data about nearby pedestrians. This kinematic data is key to enable safe robot navigation in these uncontrolled, human-filled environments. The network is trained in a supervised setting, using expert demonstrations to learn safe navigation behaviors. A series of experiments in detailed simulated environments demonstrate the efficacy of this policy, which is able to achieve a higher success rate than either standard model-based planners or state-of-the-art neural network control policies that use only raw sensor data. 
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  6. This paper introduces the normalized unused sensing capacity to measure the amount of information that a sensor is currently gathering relative to its theoretical maximum. This quantity can be computed using entirely local information and works for arbitrary sensor models, unlike previous literature on the subject. This is then used to develop a distributed coverage control strategy for a team of heterogeneous sensors that automatically balances the load based on the current unused capacity of each team member. This algorithm is validated in a multi-target tracking scenario, yielding superior results to standard approaches that do not account for heterogeneity or current usage rates. 
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  7. In this paper, we propose a distributed coverage control algorithm for mobile sensing networks that can account for bounded uncertainty in the location of each sensor. Our algorithm is capable of safely driving mobile sensors towards areas of high information distribution while having them maintain coverage of the whole area of interest. To do this, we propose two novel variants of the Voronoi diagram. The first, the convex uncertain Voronoi (CUV) diagram, guarantees full coverage of the search area. The second, collision avoidance regions (CARs), guarantee collision-free motions while avoiding deadlock, enabling sensors to safely and successfully reach their goals. We demonstrate the efficacy of these algorithms via a series of simulations with different numbers of sensors and uncertainties in the sensors’ locations. The results show that sensor networks of different scales are able to safely perform optimized distribution corresponding to the information distribution density under different localization uncertainties 
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