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  1. Free, publicly-accessible full text available May 1, 2023
  2. Free, publicly-accessible full text available February 1, 2023
  3. We give a brief survey of the recent progress in the area of mathematical well-posedness for moving boundary problems describing fluid-structure interaction between incompressible, viscous fluids and elastic, viscoelastic, and rigid solids.
  4. Abstract. We consider a nonlinear, moving boundary, fluid-structure interaction problem between a time dependent incompressible, viscous fluid flow, and an elastic structure composed of a cylindrical shell supported by a mesh of elastic rods. The fluid flow is modeled by the time-dependent Navier- Stokes equations in a three-dimensional cylindrical domain, while the lateral wall of the cylinder is modeled by the two-dimensional linearly elastic Koiter shell equations coupled to a one-dimensional system of conservation laws defined on a graph domain, describing a mesh of curved rods. The mesh supported shell allows displacements in all three spatial directions. Two-way coupling based on kinematic and dynamic coupling conditions is assumed between the fluid and composite structure, and between the mesh of curved rods and Koiter shell. Problems of this type arise in many ap- plications, including blood flow through arteries treated with vascular prostheses called stents. We prove the existence of a weak solution to this nonlinear, moving boundary problem by using the time discretization via Lie operator splitting method combined with an Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian approach, and a non-trivial extension of the Aubin-Lions-Simon compactness result to problems on moving domains.
  5. The biological response of a coronary artery can be assessed measuring the radial stress of the arterial wall, which depend on the location, arterial tortuosity, and cardiac cycle. We sought to study the radial stress and investigate which geometric distribution of stent struts is associated with favorable biologic response in tortuous coronary arteries.
  6. The biological response of a coronary artery can be assessed measuring the radial stress of the arterial wall, which depend on the location, arterial tortuosity, and cardiac cycle. We sought to study the radial stress and investigate which geometric distribution of stent struts is associated with favorable biologic response in tortuous coronary arteries.