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Title: Time Dependent Strength and Stiffness of Shear Controlled Reinforced Concrete Beams under High Sustained Stresses
Design and construction errors and material deterioration can lead to concrete elements being subjected to high levels of sustained stress well exceeding typical service levels. These high levels of sustained stress have led to structural collapses in the United States and around the world. However, the performance of shear-controlled concrete elements (beams and slab-column connections) under high sustained stress is not well understood. Under high sustained compressive stress (greater than 0.75fc’) concrete will suffer tertiary creep characterized by accelerated permanent strain, leading eventually to a failure. The bond of the reinforcing bars to the concrete is also affected leading to slip. This research presents the results of experimental tests on shear-controlled RC beams that were loaded to 81, 86, and 92 percent of their short-term capacity and observed for about four weeks. Deflection and strain measurements were recorded for each specimen throughout the sustained load test. Under high sustained stress the specimens showed continued deflection with time, with most of the deflection occurring shortly after the application of load. The failure of the specimens exhibited more flexural response than that of the control specimen. The test results show that high levels of sustained stress (up to 92% of their short-term more » capacity) can be sustained for a prolonged time; however, the deflections and cracking are increased and the ultimate failure mode may be changed. This information will help engineers identify elements nearing failure under high levels of sustained stress. « less
Authors:
; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1760915
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10156228
Journal Name:
2020 Structures Congress
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
42 to 51
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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