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Title: Emission of R6G dye in Fabry–Perot cavities in weak and strong coupling regimes

We have studied spectra and angular distribution of emission in Fabry–Perot cavities formed by two silver mirrors separated by a layer of poly (methyl methacrylate) polymer doped with rhodamine 6G (R6G) dye in low (20g/l) and high (200g/l) concentrations. The frequency of emission radiated to a cavity mode was larger at large outcoupling angles—the “rainbow” effect. At the same time, the angle of the strongest emission was also determined by the cavity size: the larger the cavity, the larger the angle. The angular distribution of emission is commonly dominated by two symmetrical lobes (located at the intersection of the three-dimensional emission cone with a horizontal plane) pointing to the left and to the right of the normal to the sample. Despite the strong Stokes shift in R6G dye, the branch of the cavity dispersion curve obtained in the emission experiment is positioned above the one obtained in the reflection (extinction) experiment. Some dye molecules are poorly coupled to cavity modes. Their emission has very broad angular distribution with the maximum atθ<#comment/>=0∘<#comment/>. The signatures of strong cavity–exciton coupling were observed at high dye concentration more » (200g/l) but not at low concentration (20g/l). The evidence of the effect of strong coupling on emission is exemplified by a strong difference in the angular distribution of emission in two almost identical cavities, one with and another without strong coupling. Most importantly, we have demonstrated the possibility to control the ground state concentration, the coupling strength, and the dye emission spectra with Q-switched laser pulses.

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Authors:
; ;
Award ID(s):
1830886 1856515
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10197041
Journal Name:
Journal of the Optical Society of America B
Volume:
37
Issue:
11
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
Article No. 3200
ISSN:
0740-3224; JOBPDE
Publisher:
Optical Society of America
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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