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Title: Complete Genome Sequence of Microcystis aeruginosa FD4, Isolated from a Subtropical River in Southwest Florida
ABSTRACT We report the first complete genome of Microcystis aeruginosa from North America. A harmful bloom that occurred in the Caloosahatchee River in 2018 led to a state of emergency declaration in Florida. Although strain FD4 was isolated from this toxic bloom, the genome did not have a microcystin biosynthetic gene cluster.
Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Editors:
Stewart, Frank J.
Award ID(s):
1664052
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10299260
Journal Name:
Microbiology Resource Announcements
Volume:
9
Issue:
38
ISSN:
2576-098X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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