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Title: Algorithmic Thresholds for Refuting Random Polynomial Systems
Consider a system of m polynomial equations {pi(x)=bi}i≤m of degree D≥2 in n-dimensional variable x∈ℝn such that each coefficient of every pi and bis are chosen at random and independently from some continuous distribution. We study the basic question of determining the smallest m -- the algorithmic threshold -- for which efficient algorithms can find refutations (i.e. certificates of unsatisfiability) for such systems. This setting generalizes problems such as refuting random SAT instances, low-rank matrix sensing and certifying pseudo-randomness of Goldreich's candidate generators and generalizations. We show that for every d∈ℕ, the (n+m)O(d)-time canonical sum-of-squares (SoS) relaxation refutes such a system with high probability whenever m≥O(n)⋅(nd)D−1. We prove a lower bound in the restricted low-degree polynomial model of computation which suggests that this trade-off between SoS degree and the number of equations is nearly tight for all d. We also confirm the predictions of this lower bound in a limited setting by showing a lower bound on the canonical degree-4 sum-of-squares relaxation for refuting random quadratic polynomials. Together, our results provide evidence for an algorithmic threshold for the problem at m≳O˜(n)⋅n(1−δ)(D−1) for 2nδ-time algorithms for all δ.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
2047933
NSF-PAR ID:
10314967
Author(s) / Creator(s):
;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Proceedings of the annual ACMSIAM symposium on discrete algorithms
ISSN:
2160-1445
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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