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Title: Application of An Active Gate Driver for Paralleling Operation of Si IGBT and SiC MOSFET
Wide band gap (WBG) devices feature high switching frequency operation and low switching loss. They have been widely adopted in tremendous applications. Nevertheless, the manufacture cost for SiC MOSFET greater than that of the Si IGBT. To achieve a trade off between cost and efficiency, the hybrid switch, which includes the paralleling operation of Si IGBT and SiC MOSFET, is proposed. In this article, an active gate driver is used for the hybrid switch to optimize both the switching and thermal performances. The turn-on and turn-off delays between two individual switches are controlled to minimize the switching loss of traditional Si IGBT. In this way, a higher switching frequency operation can be achieved for the hybrid switch to improve the converter power density. On the other hand, the gate source voltages are adjusted to achieve an optimized thermal performance between two individual switches, which can improve the reliability of the hybrid switch. The proposed active gate driver for hybrid switch is validated with a 2 kW Boost converter.
Authors:
; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1939144
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10317577
Journal Name:
IEEE 12th Energy Conversion Congress Exposition - Asia
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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