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This content will become publicly available on January 1, 2023

Title: Accessible Computational Thinking in Elementary Science
Computational thinking (CT) is ubiquitous in modern science, yet rarely integrated at the elementary school level. Moreover, access to computer science education at the PK-12 level is inequitably distributed. We believe that access to CT must be available earlier and implemented with the support of an equitable pedagogical framework. Our poster will describe our Accessible Computational Thinking (ACT) research project exploring professional development with elementary teachers on integrating computational thinking with Culturally Responsive Teaching practices.
Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Editors:
Chinn, C.; Tan, E.; Chan, C.; Kali, Y.
Award ID(s):
2101039
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10343181
Journal Name:
Proceedings of the 16th International Conference of the Learning Sciences - ICLS 2022
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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