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Title: CMIP6 Intermodel Spread in Interhemispheric Asymmetry of Tropical Climate Response to Greenhouse Warming: Extratropical Ocean Effects
Abstract

Tropical climate response to greenhouse warming is to first order symmetric about the equator but climate models disagree on the degree of latitudinal asymmetry of the tropical change. Intermodel spread in equatorial asymmetry of tropical climate response is investigated by using 37 models from phase 6 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP6). In the simple simulation with CO2increase at 1% per year but without aerosol forcing, this study finds that intermodel spread in tropical asymmetry is tied to that in the extratropical surface heat flux change related to the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) and Southern Ocean sea ice concentration (SIC). AMOC or Southern Ocean SIC change alters net energy flux at the top of the atmosphere and sea surface in one hemisphere and may induce interhemispheric atmospheric energy transport. The negative feedback of the shallow meridional overturning circulation in the tropics and the positive low cloud feedback in the subtropics are also identified. Our results suggest that reducing the intermodel spread in extratropical change can improve the reliability of tropical climate projections.

 
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Award ID(s):
2105654 1934392
NSF-PAR ID:
10368439
Author(s) / Creator(s):
 ;  ;  ;  ;  ;  ;  
Publisher / Repository:
American Meteorological Society
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Journal of Climate
Volume:
35
Issue:
14
ISSN:
0894-8755
Page Range / eLocation ID:
p. 4869-4882
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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