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Title: Relativistic Atomic Structure of Au IV and the Os Isoelectronic Sequence: Opacity Data for Kilonova Ejecta
Direct detection of gravitational waves (GWs) on 17 August 2017, propagating from a binary neutron star merger, or a “kilonova”, opened the era of multimessenger astronomy. The ejected material from neutron star mergers, or “kilonova”, is a good candidate for optical and near infrared follow-up observations after the detection of GWs. The kilonova from the ejecta of GW1780817 provided the first evidence for the astrophysical site of the synthesis of heavy nuclei through the rapid neutron capture process or r-process. Since properties of the emission are largely affected by opacities of the ejected material, enhancements in the available r-process data is important for neutron star merger modeling. However, given the complexity of the electronic structure of these heavy elements, considerable efforts are still needed to converge to a reliable set of atomic structure data. The aim of this work is to alleviate this situation for low charge state elements in the Os-like isoelectronic sequence. In this regard, the general-purpose relativistic atomic structure packages (GRASP0 and GRASP2K) were used to obtain energy levels and transition probabilities (E1 and M1). We provide line lists and expansion opacities for a range of r-process elements. We focus here on the Os isoelectronic sequence (Os I, Ir II, Pt III, Au IV, Hg V). The results are benchmarked against existing experimental data and prior calculations, and predictions of emission spectra relevant to kilonovae are provided. Fine-structure (M1) lines in the infrared potentially observable by the James Webb Space Telescope are highlighted.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1816984
NSF-PAR ID:
10389504
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Atoms
Volume:
10
Issue:
3
ISSN:
2218-2004
Page Range / eLocation ID:
94
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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