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Title: Analysis and Design of High-Efficiency Modular Multilevel Resonant DC-DC Converter
This paper demonstrates a high-efficiency modular multilevel resonant DC-DC converter (MMRC) with zero-voltage switching (ZVS) capability. In order to minimize the conduction loss in the converter, optimizing the root-mean-square (RMS) current flowing through switching devices is considered an effective approach. The analysis of circuit configuration and operating principle show that the RMS value of the current flowing through switching devices is closely related to the factors such as the resonant tank parameters, switching frequency, converter output voltage and current, etc. A quantitative analysis that considers all these factors has been performed to evaluate the RMS current of all the components in the circuit. When the circuit parameters are carefully designed, the switch current waveform can be close to the square waveform, which has a low RMS value and results in low conduction loss. And a design example based on the theoretical analysis is presented to show the design procedures of the presented converter. A 600 W 48 V-to-12 V prototype is built with the parameters obtained from the design example section. Simulation and experiments have been performed to verify the high-efficiency feature of the designed converter. The measured converter peak efficiency reaches 99.55% when it operates at 200 kHz. And its power density can be as high as 795 W/in 3 .  more » « less
Award ID(s):
2006173
NSF-PAR ID:
10491607
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ;
Publisher / Repository:
IEEE
Date Published:
Journal Name:
IEEE Open Journal of Power Electronics
Volume:
3
ISSN:
2644-1314
Page Range / eLocation ID:
755 to 771
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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Fig. 3(b) shows the tunneling probability T according to the Kane two-band model in the three materials, In0.53Ga0.47As, GaAs, and GaN, following our observation of a similar electroluminescence mechanism in GaN/AlN RTDs (due to strong polarization field of wurtzite structures) [8]. The expression is Tinter = (2/9)∙exp[(-2 ∙Ug 2 ∙me)/(2h∙P∙E)], where Ug is the bandgap energy, P is the valence-to-conduction-band momentum matrix element, and E is the electric field. Values for the highest calculated internal E fields for the InGaAs and GaN are also shown, indicating that Tinter in those structures approaches values of ~10-5. As shown, a GaAs RTD would require an internal field of ~6×105 V/cm, which is rarely realized in standard GaAs RTDs, perhaps explaining why there have been few if any reports of room-temperature electroluminescence in the GaAs devices. [1] E.R. Brown,et al., Appl. Phys. Lett., vol. 58, 2291, 1991. [5] S. Sze, Physics of Semiconductor Devices, 2nd Ed. 12.2.1 (Wiley, 1981). [2] M. Feiginov et al., Appl. Phys. Lett., 99, 233506, 2011. [6] L. Coldren, Diode Lasers and Photonic Integrated Circuits, (Wiley, 1995). [3] Y. Nishida et al., Nature Sci. Reports, 9, 18125, 2019. [7] E.O. Kane, J. of Appl. Phy 32, 83 (1961). [4] P. Fakhimi, et al., 2019 DRC Conference Digest. [8] T. Growden, et al., Nature Light: Science & Applications 7, 17150 (2018). [5] S. Sze, Physics of Semiconductor Devices, 2nd Ed. 12.2.1 (Wiley, 1981). [6] L. Coldren, Diode Lasers and Photonic Integrated Circuits, (Wiley, 1995). [7] E.O. Kane, J. of Appl. Phy 32, 83 (1961). [8] T. Growden, et al., Nature Light: Science & Applications 7, 17150 (2018). 
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