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  1. Artificial Intelligence (AI) and cybersecurity are becoming increasingly intertwined, with AI and Machine Learning (AI/ML) being leveraged for cybersecurity, and cybersecurity helping address issues caused by AI. The goal in our exploratory curricular initiative is to dovetail the need to teach these two critical, emerging topics in highschool, and create a suite of novel activities, 'AI & Cybersecurity for Teens' (ACT) that introduces AI/ML in the context of cybersecurity and prepares high school teachers to integrate them in their cybersecurity curricula. Additionally, ACT activities are designed such that teachers (and students) build a deeper understanding of how ML works and how the machine actually "learns". Such understanding will aid more meaningful interrogation of critical issues such as AI ethics and bias. ACT introduces core ML topics contextualized in cybersecurity topics through a range of programming activities and pre-programmed games in NetsBlox, an easy-to-use block-based programming environment. We conducted 2 pilot workshops with 12 high school cybersecurity teachers focused on ACT activities. Teachers' feedback was positive and encouraging but also highlighted potential challenges in implementing ACT in the classroom. This paper reports on our approach and activities design, and teachers' experiences and feedback on integrating AI into high school cybersecurity curricula. 
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  2. Computer Science (CS) Frontiers is a 4-module curriculum, 9 weeks each, designed to bring the frontiers of computing to high school girls for exploration and development. Our prior work has showcased the work in developing and piloting our first three modules, Distributed Computing, Artificial Intelligence (AI), and the Internet of Things (IoT). During the summer of 2022, we piloted the completed curricula, including the new Software Engineering module, with 56 high school camp attendees. This poster reports on the newly developed software engineering module, the experiences of 7 teachers and 11 students using the module, and our plans for improving this module prior to its release in formal high school classrooms. Initial survey and interview data indicate that teachers became comfortable with facilitating the open-endedness of the final projects and that students appreciated the connections to socially relevant topics and the ability of their projects to help with real-world problems such as flood prevention and wheelchair accessibility. The CS Frontiers curriculum has been added to course offerings in Tennessee and adoption through the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction is currently underway. Teachers from Tennessee, North Carolina, Massachusetts, and New York have piloted the materials. Together with researchers, we are working to package the course and curricula for widespread adoption as additional support to students as they try out computing courses in their high school pathways. Our aim is to increase the interest and career awareness of CS for high school girls so they may have an equitable footing to choose CS as a potential major or career. 
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  3. Existing approaches to teaching artifcial intelligence and machine learning (ML) often focus on the use of pre-trained models or fne-tuning an existing black-box architecture. We believe ML techniques and core ML topics, such as optimization and adversarial examples, can be designed for high school age students given appropriate support. Our curricular approach focuses on teaching ML ideas by enabling students to develop deep intuition about these complex concepts by first making them accessible to novices through interactive tools, pre-programmed games, and carefully designed programming activities. Then, students are able to engage with the concepts via meaningful, hands-on experiences that span the entire ML process from data collection to model optimization and inspection. This paper describes our AI & Cybersecurity for Teens suite of curricular activities aimed at high school students and teachers. 
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  4. Distributed computing, computer networking, and the Internet of Things (IoT) are all around us, yet only computer science and engineering majors learn the technologies that enable our modern lives. This paper introduces PhoneIoT, a mobile app that makes it possible to teach some of the basic concepts of distributed computation and networked sensing to novices. PhoneIoT turns mobile phones and tablets into IoT devices and makes it possible to create highly engaging projects through NetsBlox, an open-source block-based programming environment focused on teaching distributed computing at the high school level. PhoneIoT lets NetsBlox programs—running in the browser on the student’s computer—access available sensors. Since phones have touchscreens, PhoneIoT also allows building a Graphical User Interface (GUI) remotely from NetsBlox, which can be set to trigger custom code written by the student via NetsBlox’s message system. This approach enables students to create quite advanced distributed projects, such as turning their phone into a game controller or tracking their exercise on top of an interactive Google Maps background with just a few blocks of code. 
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  5. Existing approaches to teaching artificial intelligence and machine learning often focus on the use of pre-trained models or fine-tuning an existing black-box architecture. We believe advanced ML topics, such as optimization and adversarial examples, can be learned by early high school age students given appropriate support. Our approach focuses on enabling students to develop deep intuition about these complex concepts by first making them accessible to novices through interactive tools, pre-programmed games, and carefully designed programming activities. Then, students are able to engage with the concepts via meaningful, hands-on experiences that span the entire ML process from data collection to model optimization and inspection. 
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  6. The Computer Science Frontiers (CSF) project introduces teachers to the topics of artificial intelligence and distributed computing to engage their female students in computing by connecting lessons to relevant cutting edge technologies. Application topics include social media and news articles, as well as climate change, the arts (movies, music, and museum collections), and public health/medicine. CSF educators are prepared in a pedagogy and peer-teaching centered professional development program where they simultaneously learn and teach distributed computing, artificial intelligence, and internet of things lessons to each other. These professional developments allow educators to hone in on their teaching skills of these new topics and gain confidence in their ability to teach new computer science materials before running several activities with their students in the academic year classroom. In this workshop, teachers participating in the CS Frontiers professional development will give testimonials discussing their experiences teaching these topics in a two week summer camp. Attendees will then try out three computing activities, one from each Computer Science Frontiers module. Finally, there will be a question and answer session. 
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