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  1. Zero-knowledge succinct arguments of knowledge (zkSNARKs) enable efficient privacy-preserving proofs of membership for general NP languages. Our focus in this work is on post-quantum zkSNARKs, with a focus on minimizing proof size. Currently, there is a 1000x gap in the proof size between the best pre-quantum constructions and the best post-quantum ones. Here, we develop and implement new lattice-based zkSNARKs in the designated-verifier preprocessing model. With our construction, after an initial preprocessing step, a proof for an NP relation of size 2^20 is just over 16 KB. Our proofs are 10.3x shorter than previous post-quantum zkSNARKs for general NP languages. Compared to previous lattice-based zkSNARKs (also in the designated-verifier preprocessing model), we obtain a 42x reduction in proof size and a 60x reduction in the prover's running time, all while achieving a much higher level of soundness. Compared to the shortest pre-quantum zkSNARKs by Groth (Eurocrypt 2016), the proof size in our lattice-based construction is 131x longer, but both the prover and the verifier are faster (by 1.2x and 2.8x, respectively). Our construction follows the general blueprint of Bitansky et al. (TCC 2013) and Boneh et al. (Eurocrypt 2017) of combining a linear probabilistically checkable proof (linear PCP) together withmore »a linear-only vector encryption scheme. We develop a concretely-efficient lattice-based instantiation of this compiler by considering quadratic extension fields of moderate characteristic and using linear-only vector encryption over rank-2 module lattices.« less
  2. Pass, Rafael ; Pietrzak, Krzysztof (Ed.)
    We initiate a study of pseudorandom encodings: efficiently computable and decodable encoding functions that map messages from a given distribution to a random-looking distribution. For instance, every distribution that can be perfectly and efficiently compressed admits such a pseudorandom encoding. Pseudorandom encodings are motivated by a variety of cryptographic applications, including password-authenticated key exchange, “honey encryption” and steganography. The main question we ask is whether every efficiently samplable distribution admits a pseudorandom encoding. Under different cryptographic assumptions, we obtain positive and negative answers for different flavors of pseudorandom encodings, and relate this question to problems in other areas of cryptography. In particular, by establishing a two-way relation between pseudorandom encoding schemes and efficient invertible sampling algorithms, we reveal a connection between adaptively secure multiparty computation for randomized functionalities and questions in the domain of steganography.
  3. A collection of sets displays a proximity gap with respect to some property if for every set in the collection, either (i) all members are δ-close to the property in relative Hamming distance or (ii) only a tiny fraction of members are δ-close to the property. In particular, no set in the collection has roughly half of its members δ-close to the property and the others δ-far from it. We show that the collection of affine spaces displays a proximity gap with respect to Reed-Solomon (RS) codes, even over small fields, of size polynomial in the dimension of the code, and the gap applies to any δ smaller than the Johnson/Guruswami-Sudan list-decoding bound of the RS code. We also show near-optimal gap results, over fields of (at least) linear size in the RS code dimension, for δ smaller than the unique decoding radius. Concretely, if δ is smaller than half the minimal distance of an RS code V ⊂ Fq n , every affine space is either entirely δ-close to the code, or alternatively at most an ( n/q)-fraction of it is δ-close to the code. Finally, we discuss several applications of our proximity gap results to distributed storage, multi-partymore »cryptographic protocols, and concretely efficient proof systems. We prove the proximity gap results by analyzing the execution of classical algebraic decoding algorithms for Reed-Solomon codes (due to Berlekamp-Welch and Guruswami-Sudan) on a formal element of an affine space. This involves working with Reed-Solomon codes whose base field is an (infinite) rational function field. Our proofs are obtained by developing an extension (to function fields) of a strategy of Arora and Sudan for analyzing low-degree tests.« less