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Title: Long-Term Ecological Research and Evolving Frameworks of Disturbance Ecology
Abstract Detecting and understanding disturbance is a challenge in ecology that has grown more critical with global environmental change and the emergence of research on social–ecological systems. We identify three areas of research need: developing a flexible framework that incorporates feedback loops between social and ecological systems, anticipating whether a disturbance will change vulnerability to other environmental drivers, and incorporating changes in system sensitivity to disturbance in the face of global changes in environmental drivers. In the present article, we review how discoveries from the US Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) Network have influenced theoretical paradigms in disturbance ecology, and we refine a framework for describing social–ecological disturbance that addresses these three challenges. By operationalizing this framework for seven LTER sites spanning distinct biomes, we show how disturbance can maintain or alter ecosystem state, drive spatial patterns at landscape scales, influence social–ecological interactions, and cause divergent outcomes depending on other environmental changes.
Authors:
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Award ID(s):
1832229 1237517 1801244 1832221 1929393 1831937 1832194 1832016 1855277 1637661
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10138035
Journal Name:
BioScience
Volume:
70
Issue:
2
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
141 to 156
ISSN:
0006-3568
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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