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Title: Uncovering low frequency band gaps in electrically resonant metamaterials through tuned dissipation and negative impedance conversion
Abstract A new class of electromechanically coupled metamaterial is presented which relies on magnetic field interactions between the host structure and a local resonator circuit to realize novel vibration control capabilities. The metamaterial chain exhibits a highly tunable vibration band gap which can be easily placed at a desired frequency using the resonant circuit parameters, providing a robust mechanism to independently alter the band gap width, depth, and frequency of maximum attenuation. In its dissipative form, the electromechanical metamaterial is shown to exhibit electrical metadamping as a function of the local resonance circuit resistance. The impact of the damping ratio as a function of the electrical resistance is characterized in frequency and time domains, and related to the infinite system dynamics. A robust experimental realization of the system is constructed which achieves electromechanical coupling through a moving coil and magnet system. The apparatus is used to show that the band gap location and depth can be readily tuned with the circuit elements. The presented metamaterial has potential for meaningful vibroacoustic practical applications in addition to revealing fundamentally new properties of damped electrically-resonant structures.
Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1904254
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10303768
Journal Name:
Smart Materials and Structures
Volume:
31
Issue:
1
ISSN:
0964-1726
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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