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Title: Constant Regret Resolving Heuristics for Price-Based Revenue Management
Price-based revenue management is an important problem in operations management with many practical applications. The problem considers a seller who sells one or multiple products over T consecutive periods and is subject to constraints on the initial inventory levels of resources. Whereas, in theory, the optimal pricing policy could be obtained via dynamic programming, computing the exact dynamic programming solution is often intractable. Approximate policies, such as the resolving heuristics, are often applied as computationally tractable alternatives. In this paper, we show the following two results for price-based network revenue management under a continuous price set. First, we prove that a natural resolving heuristic attains O(1) regret compared with the value of the optimal policy. This improves the [Formula: see text] regret upper bound established in the prior work by Jasin in 2014. Second, we prove that there is an [Formula: see text] gap between the value of the optimal policy and that of the fluid model. This complements our upper bound result by showing that the fluid is not an adequate information-relaxed benchmark when analyzing price-based revenue management algorithms. Funding: This work was supported in part by the National Science Foundation [Grant CMMI-2145661].  more » « less
Award ID(s):
2145661
NSF-PAR ID:
10389113
Author(s) / Creator(s):
;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Operations Research
Volume:
70
Issue:
6
ISSN:
0030-364X
Page Range / eLocation ID:
3538 to 3557
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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